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Research & Collections

Citizen Science Initiatives

OdonataCentral makes use of relational databases to dynamically generate maps, checklists, and accompanying data. We have worked hard to make sure that the delivery and processing times for this information is as fast as possible, but to achieve the most from this site you will need a fast broadband connection. The site is best viewed using Mozilla Firefox at a minimum screen resolution of 1024×768. The interactive maps make use of Google Maps and will be perform under the conditions designated by Google.

The initial distribution data used on this site is based on the North American Dot Map Project. A project initiated by Nick Donnelly and involving more than 100 contributors from the Odonata community. The goal of this project was to accurately document the distributions of all North American species. Please note, the records contributed by this project represent county centroids, not actual localities. The final product from this project was published as a three volume set in 2004.

 

To better understand and conserve North America’s dragonfly migration, dragonfly experts, nongovernmental programs, academic institutions, and federal agencies from the United States, Mexico, and Canada have formed the collaborative¬†Migratory Dragonfly Partnership (MDP).

Regular monitoring and centralized reporting among participants across three nations will help us answer some of the many questions currently surrounding dragonfly migration and provide information needed to create cross-border conservation programs to protect and sustain the phenomenon. This site will allow you to submit dragonfly migration observations.

 

Dragonfly Pond Watch is a volunteer-based program of the Migratory Dragonfly Partnership (MDP) to investigate the annual movements of five major migratory dragonfly species in North America: Common Green Darner (Anax junius), Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerata), Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens), Spot-winged Glider (Pantala hymenaea), and Variegated Meadowhawk (Sympetrum corruptum). By visiting the same wetland or pond site on a regular basis, participants will be placed to note the arrival of migrant dragonflies moving south in the fall or north in the spring, as well as to record when the first resident adults of these species emerge in the spring.

 

iNaturalist.org

Biodiversity of Alabama Project

The Alabama Museum of Natural History created this project to record observations of all organisms found in Alabama, one of the most biologically diverse states in the United States. This diversity is a product of Alabama’s warm, moist climate, its great geologic diversity, and its rich evolutionary past. With more than 4,533 documented species, Alabama ranks fifth among states in terms of overall species diversity, and is first among states east of the Mississippi River. The large western states of California, Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico lead the nation, and fellow southeastern states Georgia (sixth) and Florida (seventh) trail Alabama. Alabama harbors 64 types of terrestrial ecosystems, including 25 forests and woodlands, 11 wetlands, and 7 glades and prairies. The state also supports 132,000 miles of rivers and streams and several dozen marine ecosystems.

 

Moundville Archaeological Park Biodiversity Survey

The Moundville Archaeological Park Biodiversity Survey gives visitors an opportunity to share their natural history observations with the park’s community while contributing to growing citizen-science datasets on the distribution of the plants and animals of the preserve. We hope you’ll add your observations each time you visit us!

 

University of Alabama Campus Biodiversity Survey

The Alabama Museum of Natural History created this project to give UA students, faculty, staff, and visitors an opportunity to share their natural history observations while contributing to growing citizen-science datasets on the distribution of the plants and animals that share campus with us. We hope you’ll add your observations each time you visit!